Monthly Archives: March 2004

Iron Lute

Jeremy Bowers keeps a developer’s journal for something called Iron Lute, which is an attempt to write another outliner in Python/Tk. What’s wrong with Leo? Well, he points out that Leo is really an application of an outliner, not
an outliner itself
. That is, it just has a tree widget and a text widget, instead of having a real outliner widget.

Interestingly enough, that precisely why I thought Leo was cool, while other outliner projects (like JOE) just made me shrug: It’s not trying to sell you on the technology, it’s showing you how the technology can solve interesting problems (project management, literate programming). Iron Lute, on the other hand, looks like another case of someone falling in love with the technology (and you have to admit that there are a lot of cool things to fall in love with in Userland’s toolchest).

Still, his technical discussion is interesting to read, and walks through a lot of the issues. Pity he’s making the same mistake (well, "short sighted decision") made in Leo by choosing a GUI toolkit that doesn’t support BiDi. I wonder if there is any cross-platform toolkit that fits the bill.

Update: Jeremy Bowers responds in the comments; he also blogs his comment, with added material.

Telefon Tel Aviv

Telefon Tel Aviv is an ambient duo from the US. Here is an excerpt from an interview they gave Joel Bordeaux:

JB:
Is there any significance of the name "Telefon Tel Aviv," other than the consonance?
Charles:
Just the poetic quality. We wanted it to be something to invoke imagery. I don’t think we need a meaning. But we were invited to go play in outside Tel Aviv, in the desert. It looked like The Last Temptation of Christ, which was really cool.
JB:
Did you do it?
Josh:
No. We got kind of scared, what with the suicide bombers and all that. We didn’t think two American Catholic boys would fare well over there with both sides trying to put an end to it. I’d probably the only person in the entire Middle East with dreadlocks.

How charming when "Tel Aviv" becomes just an exotic word, like "Tokyo", "Singapore" or "California". Then you remember that "Beirut" and "Sudan" are also just exotic words to most people.