Monthly Archives: November 2003

Anders’ Aberrant

Bulk and Surface, an Aberrant campaign, hidden in Anders Sandberg’s games directory.

It seems to be a fairly straight take, except that it looks like he’s ditched White Wolf’s metaplot (Aeon, Utopia, Terragen) and he provides a whole new level of technobabble to "explain" the Supes:

A variant (theory – DD) suggests that novas are infected with a self-organizing quantum mechanical resonance state in the microtubuli network that produces their powers.

Let’s Speak Alien

A Primer In
SF Xenolinguistics – LET’S SPEAK ALIEN – In Ten Easy Lessons:

LESSON THREE
Initial K is especially popular (Kazon, Klendathu, Krell, K’kree). Incidentally, there’s a good reason for this (and one I’ll credit to Steve Mowbray): aliens are obsessed with triangles, a particular shade of green, the number three, and the letter K because they learned everything they know from our TV broadcasts. To be more specific, from a particular episode of "Sesame Street".

Organ Printing

Tissue-engineering.net: Organ Printing:

An interesting new approach of Tissue Engineering was reported by US scientists(1):
Tissue engineering technology promises to solve the organ transplantation crisis. However, assembly of vascularized 3D soft organs remains a big challenge.

Tissue Engineers, as well as doctors and their patients, do not have the luxury to wait years until engineered tissues and organs become morphologically, biochemically, mechanically and functionally differentiated. Existing tissue technologies do not enable rapid assembling of tissues and organs.

Organ printing, which the scientists define as computer-aided, jet-based 3D Tissue Engineering of living human organs, offers a possible solution…

What’s Your Threat Model?

WYTM is part of Ian Grigg’s SSL Considered Harmful rant collection. His point is that SSL’s assumptions (that "man in the middle" attacks are a threat, but the client and server are secure) are wrong: clients and servers are constantly port-scanned, hacked and infected with viruses, while what’s sent over the line is pretty much unmolested.
Except he says it much better.

(Link via Kevin Marks)